2017 Hawaii Legislative Watch: People vs. Government

Posted March 14, 2017 by Rachelle Chang
Categories: Government

Tags: , , , ,

Hawaii Legislature 2017

The 2017 Hawaii Legislative Session started on January 18 with prayers, speeches, and music. Hawaii residents definitely need the prayers – our lawmakers have been busy, introducing 1,601 bills in the House of Representatives and 1,317 bills in the Senate. It’s a mountain of paperwork, negotiation, tax dollars, and details.

Every year, I do a legislative round-up that spotlights bills that could have a big impact on Hawaii. I will focus on taxes, education, individual rights vs. government powers, controversial issues, and (in my opinion) unnecessary and wasteful spending. With over 2,900 bills being proposed in 2017 and less time than ever to read through them, I rely as always on bill summaries to accurately reflect the bills’ intentions.

Here is an overview of bills being proposed in the 2017 Legislative Session that have to do with individual rights vs. government powers. This is a long post, so I’ve organized the bills into five sections: 4 bills about elections and voting, 4 bills that show government on our side, 4 bills that put checks on government power, 3 innovative bills that try to help the homeless, 3 unconvincing bills that try to help the homeless and could end up causing more problems. If I’ve missed any important bills, please let me know!

4 bills about elections and voting:

  1. Elections by mail (11 proposals), with various start dates and procedures. HB131, HB1401, SB175, and SB334 would start in 2020. HB291, HB1187, HB1269, SB428, SB459, and SB1066 would start in 2018. I like the idea of voting by mail or Internet, because it saves us time and money, though I will miss going to my polling place on election day and feeling the energy of other voters.
  2. Automatic voter registration (13 proposals) with driver’s licenses and ID cards. HB292, HB439, SB206, SB301, and SB811 would require automatic voter registration when applying for a new or renewed motor vehicle driver’s license, provisional license, or instruction permit; or a new, renewed, or duplicate identification card. HB245, HB1188, HB1268, HB1290, SB231, SB246, SB460, and SB855 would require automatic voter registration when applying for a civil identification card or driver’s license. I encourage everyone to vote, but I think that choosing note to vote is also a right.
  3. Voting age lowered to 16 years. HB1576 asks for a study about lowering the voting age to 16 years. I don’t think we need a study about this. Vote about it – or not.
  4. Getting rid of partisanship. SB106 would remove party affiliation or nonpartisanship in primary, general, and special elections. I strongly support nonpartisan elections.

4 bills that show government on our side:

  1. Residency requirements for public assistance. SB1241 would establish residency requirements in order to receive public assistance and state low-income housing. We need to help Hawaii residents first.
  2. One job for the governor, mayor, and elected officials. HB71 would prohibit the governor or mayor from maintaining outside employment or receiving emoluments. HB969 would prohibit elected officials from receiving a second income that is more than 20% of their government salary. This would avoid possible conflicts of interest.
  3. Common-sense restrictions on drunk drivers. HB306 would require drunk drivers to be fitted with a continuous alcohol monitoring device. Driving is a privilege, not a right.
  4. Encouraging health professionals in Hawaii. SB735 would create a loan repayment program for medical professionals who work in underserved areas of Hawaii. We need to ensure that everyone has reasonable access to healthcare professionals.

4 bills that put checks on government power:

  1. More power for the people: initiative, referendum, and recall. HB1201 would empower voters with Direct Initiative, Popular Referendum, and Recall. HB444, SB832, and SB833 would empower voters with Initiative. HB1365 would empower voters with Referendum. HB962 and HB1430 would empower voters with Recall. This is true grassroots power.
  2. Supermajorities required for tax increases and new taxes. HB353 would require a two-thirds supermajority voting requirement for the legislature to pass laws that raise taxes or create new taxes. Taxes are never temporary, so we need to scrutinize tax increases and new taxes.
  3. Term limits for legislators. HB411 would limit legislators to 20 consecutive years of service. SB827 and SB828 would limit legislators to 12 consecutive years of service. I hope that more citizen-legislators get involved in government.
  4. No “gut and replace” bills. SB1135 would prohibit the passage of bills that have been amended so that they no longer reflect their original purpose, unless the bill is approved by a two-thirds vote in both the house and senate. It doesn’t seem ethical to completely change proposed legislation and pretend that it’s the same bill.

3 innovative bills that try to help the homeless:

  1. Mobile clinics and mobile courts for the homeless. HB527 would create two mobile clinics to serve the homeless population. SB718 would create a community court outreach to serve the homeless population and individuals unable to travel to the State court. If we want them to participate, we need to take medical care and courts to where the homeless are.
  2. Work-for-a-Day jobs program for the homeless. HB1281 would create a three-year Work-for-a-Day Pilot Program that provides homeless individuals with work opportunities and connects them with service providers. Having a job increases self-esteem and gives people a sense of purpose.
  3. Stay-for-Work program. HB1374 would create a Stay-for-Work Program to homeless individuals and families with legal campsites at parks in exchange for their volunteer services maintaining park grounds. This would encourage people to protect the land they are staying on, instead of destroying it.

3 unconvincing bills that try to help the homeless and could end up causing more problems:

  1. Yard space and driveways for the homeless. HB968 would allow property owners to lease yard space or driveway space to campers and recreational camping vehicles. This could cause safety and sanitation concerns residential neighborhoods.
  2. Homeless campgrounds. HB1377, HB1447, and SB1243 would create residential campgrounds for the homeless. I don’t think that a “tent city” is the answer.
  3. Pu’uhonua safe zones for the homeless. SB158 would create Pu’uhonua Safe Zones where homeless persons may reside. SB1223 is an omnibus bill of good and bad ideas, one of which would create Pu’uhonua Safe Zones. Is this something like a “sanctuary city” or a “tent city”? Would this be safe for the homeless or safe for the public?

The 2017 Hawaii Legislature adjourns on May 4. Please think about these issues and how they may affect you, everyone around you, our children, and our grandchildren. Whether you have concerns or feel strongly about an issue, speak up, talk about it, and be part of the discussion!

2017 Hawaii Legislative Watch: Education

Posted March 7, 2017 by Rachelle Chang
Categories: Education, Government

Tags: , , ,

Hawaii Legislature 2017

The 2017 Hawaii Legislative Session started on January 18 with prayers, speeches, and music. Hawaii residents definitely need the prayers – our lawmakers have been busy, introducing 1,601 bills in the House of Representatives and 1,317 bills in the Senate. It’s a mountain of paperwork, negotiation, tax dollars, and details.

Every year, I do a legislative round-up that spotlights bills that could have a big impact on Hawaii. I will focus on taxes, education, individual rights vs. government powers, controversial issues, and (in my opinion) unnecessary and wasteful spending. With over 2,900 bills being proposed in 2017 and less time than ever to read through them, I rely as always on bill summaries to accurately reflect the bills’ intentions.

Here is an overview of the significant education bills being proposed in the 2017 Legislative Session. I’ve organized the bills into three sections: 6 bills that could be positive steps in education, 5 bills that micromanage schools, and 3 bills that need more discussion. If I’ve missed any important bills, please let me know!

6 bills that could be positive steps in education:

  1. Promoting careers in teaching. HB1169 would require the University of Hawaii to promote careers in teaching to high school students. Instead of complaining about the lack of teachers, we can do something about it.
  2. Promoting college savings. HB1074 and SB940 would allow State income tax deductions for college savings. Instead of worrying about student debt, we can encourage families to save more for college.
  3. Making college more accessible and affordable. HB1154 and 1020 would offer scholarships at UH community colleges. HB1591, HB1594, SB135 and SB1162 would create a scholarship program called the University of Hawaii Promise Program. SB15 would make community college tuition free for residents. I tentatively support this program, but I want to know more about how much it would cost and how students would qualify.
  4. Reducing the burden of student loans. HB958 would allow individuals to pay student loan debt with pre-tax income. HB1276 and SB1081 would offer a State income tax deduction of up to $5,000 per year for student loan interest paid on qualified education loans. This could help reduce anxiety and student loan defaults.
  5. Promoting computer science classes. HB1166 and SB299 would encourage computer science classes in high school and college. Technology jobs can help keep Hawaii’s graduates in Hawaii.
  6. Getting ready to work. SB298 would create a Workforce Readiness program that would allow students to graduate from an extended high school enrollment with a high school diploma and an industry-recognized associate’s degree. SB619 would create a K-12 Curriculum to Career Pipeline initiative. We need to prepare students for getting jobs – and promotions.

5 bills that micromanage schools:

  1. Legislating class size and minimum teacher salary. SB176 would limit the class size in public schools to 18 students and establish a minimum salary for new teachers of $55,000 per year. I think schools should have the flexibility to decide class size.
  2. 100 years of student records. HB1232 and SB1100 would require schools to keep student records for at least 100 years. Why 100 years? Why would someone need their school records from over 50 years ago?
  3. Jumping through hoops for innovation grants. HB1092 and SB958 would make teachers and schools write grants for “innovative” programs. I think schools should be the gate-keepers of innovation, and teachers should not have to spend extra time writing grant proposals.
  4. School libraries required. SB616 would require all public schools to have a library. I think that schools should make this decision.
  5. Legislator approval for university tuition fees. HB23 would require University of Hawaii tuition increases to be approved by the Hawaii State legislature. I think that UH should retain the authority to set tuition, without getting politicians involved.

3 bills that need more discussion:

  1. Local school boards. HB1201 would create at least 7 local school boards. One school district may offer cost savings (economies of scale); local school districts may offer more flexible and innovative solutions. Before creating a flatter bureaucracy with more bureaucrats, can we fix the system we have?
  2. Anti-bullying classes for students and parents. HB890 and SB561 would require anti-bullying policies that include anti-bullying classes for students who have engaged in bullying as well as their parents/guardians. I think that the parents who would attend an anti-bullying class are the parents who already support their children. Are there other, less formal ways to reach students and parents?
  3. Student loan forgiveness for State employees. SB348 would offer a loan forgiveness program for University of Hawaii graduates who work for the State or county. While I admire innovative solutions to student loan debt, I think this would be an expensive program and could result in government expansion as more people work for the government.

The 2017 Hawaii Legislature adjourns on May 4. Please think about these issues and how they may affect you, everyone around you, our children, and our grandchildren. Whether you have concerns or feel strongly about an issue, speak up, talk about it, and be part of the discussion!

“The Power of Broke” by Daymond John

Posted March 4, 2017 by Rachelle Chang
Categories: Book Reviews

Tags: , , , ,

The Power of Broke

I’ve watched a few episodes of “Shark Tank” (ABC), and I find it to be both inspiring and intimidating. We get to meet passionate entrepreneurs and we watch the often brutal scrutiny of their dreams, or rather their business plans. So I was really interested to learn more about the successful “sharks,” written by successful “shark” and FUBU CEO and founder Daymond John.

“The Power of Broke: How Empty Pockets, a Tight Budget, and a Hunger for Success Can Become Your Greatest Competitive Advantage” (2016), written by Daymond John with Daniel Paisner, highlights wildly successful individuals who have a “power of broke” mindset. The mindset is simple: “When you’ve got nothing to lose, you’ve got everything to gain.” John writes, “The choice of whether to succeed – or not – is all mine.”

John’s writing is conversational and informal – you really feel as if he is talking to you in a coffee shop or bar. His advice is encouraging, down-to-earth, and passionate. I really appreciated his emphasis on how we are in control of our success or failure (it’s all in our attitude) and his commitment to setting goals – he consistently sets goals for health, family, business, relationships, and philanthropy, each with expiration dates.

John points out that the most innovative products, services, and brands happen organically, authentically, usually from the people on the streets, not in boardrooms. He identifies 5 “Shark Points” that will help us succeed:

Set a goal. Be realistic and commit to it.
Homework, do yours. Know your field. Know your competitors. Know your stuff.
Adore what you do. Love what you are doing.
Remember, you are the brand. Everything you say and do reflects your business.
Keep swimming. Always be on the looking for an opportunity.

While discussing successful founders and inventors who embody the Shark Points, John shares his personal story of growing up with a single mother who worked multiple jobs, but was there for him in high school to make sure he kept on track and out of trouble. In a way, it is a testament to dedicating parenting. From shoveling driveways to a ride-sharing business to selling clothes out of the back of a van, while coping with dyslexia, we see John’s determination to make a better life for himself, relying on hard-work and creativity in seeing a need (for clean driveways, for safe and fast transportation, for clothes that make a statement) and filling it.

Here are John’s 8 Broke Power Principles:

  1. Use all of the resources available to you to your smartest advantage, like other people’s money.
  2. Keep it real. Strive for authenticity in everything you do.
  3. Make the best use of your time, energy, actions, opportunity costs, and capital.
  4. Solve other people’s problems and you will be rewarded.
  5. Believe in yourself and your product, service, or business. People invest in people.
  6. Understand and appreciate everyone you meet on your path to success – investor, distributor, vendor, prospective buyer, and customer.
  7. Think beyond the moment.
  8. Expect success. Keep your goals in sight and in reach.

“The Power of Broke” assumes that you have found your passion, and that you need the inspiration and the tools to take it to the next level. Two entrepreneurs stood out for me: a football player who saw a need for moisture-wicking clothes for athletes and founded Under Armour (Kevin Plank); and a 9-year old who grew his passion for fashionable bow ties into a successful business (Moziah Bridges and his mother Tramica Morris). They had an idea, but not the know-how; and they were driven to succeed.

What are you passionate about? What product or service could you create that could make the world better?

2017 Hawaii Legislative Watch: Taxes

Posted February 28, 2017 by Rachelle Chang
Categories: Government, Taxes

Tags: , , ,

Hawaii Legislature 2017

The 2017 Hawaii Legislative Session started on January 18 with prayers, speeches, and music. Hawaii residents definitely need the prayers – our lawmakers have been busy, introducing 1,601 bills in the House of Representatives and 1,317 bills in the Senate. It’s a mountain of paperwork, negotiation, tax dollars, and details.

Every year, I do a legislative round-up that spotlights bills that could have a big impact on Hawaii. I will focus on taxes, education, individual rights vs. government powers, controversial issues, and (in my opinion) unnecessary and wasteful spending. With over 2,900 bills being proposed in 2017 and less time than ever to read through them, I rely as always on bill summaries to accurately reflect the bills’ intentions.

Here is an overview of the significant tax bills being proposed in the 2017 Legislative Session. I’ve organized the bills into two sections: 9 tax increases to watch out for and 7 bills that could save us time and money. If I’ve missed any important bills, please let me know!

9 tax increases to watch out for:

  1. Taxes on Internet purchases. HB398 and SB161 would require out-of-state businesses to collect general excise (GE) taxes. HB1413 creates a “voluntary” program. This is taxation without representation for out-of-state businesses, and it would be a burden on Hawaii residents who already pay higher shipping costs.
  2. Higher general excise (GE) taxes. HB1319, SB1132 and SB1132 would increase the general excise tax by 0.5% to fund education. HB924 would increase the GE tax by 1% to fund agricultural land purchases. Any GE tax increases should be looked at with suspicion, because they tax transactions from wholesale to distribution to retail.
  3. Higher property taxes. HB180, HB182, HB1254, and SB686 add an education surcharge on residential investment properties and visitor accommodations. Real estate and property taxes are high enough – this could be a small step towards adding an education surcharge for everyone.
  4. Permanent county surcharges on GE taxes. HB349, HB1442, HB1565, SB432, and SB1183 would make county surcharges permanent. SB576 and SB1176 would extend the county surcharge on mass transit beyond 2027 and allow the surcharge to be used for operation and maintenance of mass transit, as well as public transportation and road maintenance. SB1278 would extend the county surcharge on mass transit to 2047 and allow the surcharge to be used for affordable housing and transit-oriented development. Apparently, there is no such thing as a “temporary” tax.
  5. New family leave insurance tax. SB408 would create a family leave insurance program and require employees to make contributions into a trust fund. No new payroll taxes!
  6. Higher costs to own and operate a car. HB1144 and SB1010 would increase the state motor vehicle weight tax. HB1145 and SB1011 would increase the state motor vehicle registration fee. HB1146, SB1009 and SB1012 would increases the State Fuel Tax. HB1259 and SB1187 would add a clean transportation fee. Higher taxes won’t necessarily make our roads better-maintained.
  7. New tax on sugar-sweetened beverages. HB1210, SB375 and SB837 would add a fee on sugar-sweetened beverages.
  8. Higher taxes on cell phones and cell phone plans. HB206, HB1021, and SB887 would add a 2.64% surcharge on prepaid wireless services for Enhanced 911 services.
  9. Discouraging visitors from coming to Hawaii. HB401 would increase the rental motor vehicle customer facility charge from $4.50 to $9.00. HB546 would increase the transient accommodations tax (TAT) to fund workforce housing development. HB1453 and SB1143 would add a $20 visitor tax to fund conservation. Why penalize visitors for spending their time and money in Hawaii?

7 bills that could save us time and money:

  1. Repealing the county rail surcharge. HB970 would end the 0.5% county surcharge for Honolulu mass transit.
  2. Repealing the estate tax. HB364 would end the inheritance and estate taxes. We shouldn’t have to pay taxes on money that was already taxed.
  3. Lower income taxes for lower-income taxpayers. HB362 and HB690 would decreases income taxes by twenty-five per cent for all but top income earners.
  4. More county surcharge taxes benefiting the county. HB719 would reduce the amount of the county surcharge that goes to the State from 10% to 5%. HB1072, SB431, SB938, SB1242, and SB1276 do not specify the lower reimbursement rate. HB1002 would reimburse the State 0.5% and use 9.5% for infrastructure improvements along the rail corridor.
  5. A new earned income tax credit. HB209, HB212, HB352, HB670, SB508, SB648, and SB707 would create an earned income tax credit.
  6. Extending the food/excise tax credit. HB209, HB210, HB932, SB256, and SB648 would extend the food/excise tax credit.
  7. Quarterly withholding tax filings. HB1141 and SB1007 would allow withholding taxes to be paid quarterly instead of monthly. We could save time, paperwork, and record-keeping.

The 2017 Hawaii Legislature adjourns on May 4. Please think about these issues and how they may affect you, everyone around you, our children, and our grandchildren. Whether you have concerns or feel strongly about an issue, speak up, talk about it, and be part of the discussion!

 

Full circle about single-payer health insurance

Posted February 21, 2017 by Rachelle Chang
Categories: Health

Tags: , , ,

Choose Your Health Insurance

I never understood why there is so much support for a national, single-payer healthcare system – until I started working in a small medical office.

Just last year, I believed that commercial health insurance is good for consumers. It is better for us as patients, in terms of flexibility (choosing the plan that fits you), choice (access to doctors you trust), and price (insurance plans must compete for your business, keeping their premiums reasonable and benefits attractive). It is better for healthcare providers, because they can choose which healthcare plans to accept; insurance companies with unreasonable requirements or low reimbursement rates could be avoided. Theoretically.

For healthcare providers, our current healthcare system can be a nightmare. Each healthcare plan has different copays, different deductibles, and vastly different levels of reimbursements. Some payers reimburse providers promptly; some payers may take months. It’s not fair to providers, who may have to wait a long time before they get compensated for their work. How many of us would go to work if we are not sure how much we will get paid, or when we’ll get a paycheck?

Even a small medical office, with a limited number of healthcare providers and billing codes, generates a lot of paperwork. Electronic billing helps, but there are still pre-authorizations, progress notes, requests for documentation, paper claims for payers who don’t accept electronic billing, and customer service phone calls to find out the status of a claim or why a claim was denied.

I’ve had problems with two insurance companies who each insist that the other is “primary” and should be billed first. I’ve had claims that get lost in the system, and then have to be “escalated” for payment. I’ve learned that military plans are “secondary” payers – except when they are “primary” payers.

For healthcare providers, I see the allure of a single-payer system: one claim form, one customer relations contact, one billing contact. Theoretically.

But the more I learn, the more I realize that a single-payer health insurance could be an even bigger nightmare than our current system. A monopoly on healthcare coverage, authorizations, and payments would not be good for anyone.

Consumers would have a limited choice of plans and providers, and under current law would be forced to buy health insurance that they may not be able to afford. Healthcare providers would have little recourse if the single-payer refuses a claim or underpays a claim.

In a short time, I’ve realized that the government health insurance payers (military, veterans, Medicare, and Medicaid) are the most difficult payers to work with. Government payers often take longer to reimburse providers – sometimes three times as long as commercial insurance companies. Government payers often pay providers less – sometimes 25% less than commercial insurance companies. Government payers often fall short in informing people that they need to have an authorization before they see a healthcare provider – and there is little recourse for appeals.

I was beguiled by the idea of single-payer health insurance, until I realized that the single-payer would be a government payer. I’ve come full circle, skeptical that single-payer health insurance would be an improvement over our current healthcare system.

If you work in the healthcare profession, what has been your experience with medical billing and claims? If you’ve lived in a country with a single-payer health insurance, what has been your experience with medical costs and care?

 

Clipart courtesy of All-Free-Download.com.

 

Read, write, click love

Posted February 14, 2017 by Rachelle Chang
Categories: Family

Tags: , ,

Valentine

“I have a dream I hope will come true
That you’re here with me and I’m here with you
I wish that the earth, sea, the sky up above-a
Will send me someone to lava”
“Lava” by Kuana Torres Kahele, Napua Greig & James Ford Murphy

When I was younger, Valentine’s Day was about storgē (familial love) and philía (brotherly love) with time spent with family, cards to all my classmates, heart-shaped cookies (with frosting and sprinkles), and cupcakes. As a young adult, Valentine’s Day swelled to include éros (romantic love) – with flowers, a special dinner, or a night out with friends. As a parent, Valentine’s Day broadened to agape (unconditional love) – putting children and family first, giving my son the last cookie.

You don’t need to buy candy, gifts, or flowers to celebrate Valentine’s Day. You can read, write, or click love.

1. Read. Read a love story –a romance, short story, poem, novel, or biography about someone who loves deeply, about close friendships; about enduring love; about giving relationships with animals. For a fantasy romance about true love, read “The Princess Bride.” Or get inspired by reading love letters on MyDearValentine.com.

2. Write. Write a note describing a time when you felt especially loved, or something you have done to make someone else feel especially loved. Write a love letter to a friend or mentor. Or write a Valentine’s Day Coupon Book, with ideas like a movie night, ice cream for dinner, or staying up extra late. Happy Money Saver has collected 10 fun free printables for kids and adults.

3. Click. Spend time with the people, animals, and places you love, and take photos to commemorate your time together. When my son was younger, I enjoyed creating photo Valentine’s Day cards. One of my favorites was posing his body to spell out the word “LOVE” (the photo in this post). Today, it’s so easy to customize photos with words and clipart to send a special message.

How do you celebrate Valentine’s Day? What is the most memorable way someone has shown you that they care?

A 1-2 punch of tax proposals

Posted February 7, 2017 by Rachelle Chang
Categories: Government, Taxes

Tags: , , ,

1-2 Punch of Taxes

So far, 2017 has delivered a one-two punch for Hawaii residents.

In January, as we were still reeling from holiday celebrations and new year’s resolutions, the Hawaii State Teachers Association (HSTA) proposed a constitutional amendment to add a property tax surcharge on residential investment properties as well as a visitor accommodations surcharge (Honolulu Star-Advertiser, “HSTA pitches property tax, hotel surcharge to hire, retain teachers,” 1/24/17). The surcharges could raise $500 million a year for hiring and retaining teachers.

A week later, Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell proposed offering the State of Hawaii a larger share of the of the 0.5% general excise tax surcharge that was intended to fully fund the rail project, in exchange for extending the surcharge in perpetuity. The State’s “share” is currently 10% (Honolulu Star-Advertiser, “Mayor proposes larger share of rail tax for state,” 2/1/17).

Is it reasonable to require homeowners to pay higher taxes for a service that is unrelated to their home or property? Is it reasonable to require non-residents to pay a dedicated tax for Hawaii public education? Is it effective to create a dedicated funding source that has little oversight by Hawaii legislators and taxpayers?

Public education is funded by state income taxes and the general excise tax. Hawaii’s property taxes can barely pay for the current level of city services; and the transient accommodations tax (TAT) has already jumped to 9.25% in 2017. It’s disingenuous to compare Hawaii’s real property taxes and TAT to other U.S. cities – Hawaii residents have higher costs of living and lower availability of land and affordable housing than other mainland cities; and visitors face higher transportation costs and time commitments just to travel to Hawaii. In greater numbers, homeowners could be forced out of their homes and visitors will choose to vacation elsewhere.

Is it reasonable and effective for the City and County of Honolulu to claim that they need to make the rail surcharge permanent, while simultaneously claiming that they don’t need the full amount of the surcharge?

The Honolulu rail is funded by the general excise tax surcharge. Without another extension, or making the surcharge permanent, Honolulu rail may not be built. But offering the State of Hawaii an even higher percentage of the general excise tax surcharge seems like a bribe to Hawaii legislators in exchange for their support.

For some perspective, in Fiscal Year 2016, collections of Honolulu’s county surcharge totaled $259.2 million, according to the “Hawaii Department of Taxation Annual Report 2015-2016” (page 30). The State kept 10% of the surcharge collected or $25.92 million – which is more than the Department of Taxation’s entire Fiscal Year 2016 operating budget of $24 million (page 37).

Do you think these tax proposals are good ideas? How do you rank public education and Honolulu rail on your list of priorities for Hawaii?